Cologne Cathedral

Cologne Cathedral Side View

Cologne Cathedral is Roman Catholic church in Cologne, Germany. Construction started in 1248 and is Germany’s most visited attraction with 20,000 people visiting each day. Cologne Cathedral is an example of Gothic architecture and is a World Heritage Site. Construction of Cologne Cathedral was only completed in 1880 due to construction stopping in 1473 with work only resuming in the 19th century. The cathedral is 144.5m long and 86.5m wide.

Cologne Cathedral

Cologne Cathedral

Visitors to Cologne Cathedral can climb 509 steps to a viewing platform 98m from the ground. The platform provides a view of Cologne and the Rhine. The cathedral has a main nave that leads to the chancel which has two side naves. A new lighting concept was introduced in 2007 in the south cross nave. An artist by the name of Gerhard Richter, based in Cologne created a new work of art from colored squares conversing 100m2 which is line with what the builders from the middle ages wanted. The choir stalls are the largest in Germany with 104 seats. The cathedral has four medieval bells and eleven in total. The cathedral contains the Shrine of the Three Kings. It is believed to contain the remains of the Three Wise Men whose relics were acquired by Frederick Barbarossa.

Cologne Cathedral Nave

Cologne Cathedral Nave

Cologne Cathedral was placed on the “World Heritage in Danger” list in 2004 because plans were approved for a building nearby which would have hampered the view of the cathedral. A compromise was reached after the limit was placed on buildings near Cologne Cathedral and it was removed from the list in 2006.

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